Examining The Relationship Between Cigarette Usage and the Influence of Interpersonal Relationships

Authors

  • Daniel McCoy University of Maryland College Park
  • Nasiru Gill Prince George's Community College
  • Victoria C. Taylor Prince George's Community College
  • Deidre Thompson Prince George's Community College
  • Sonial Bell Prince George's Community College

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.47611/jsr.vi.825

Keywords:

Tobacco Usage, Interpersonal Relationships, Smoking cessation

Abstract

Tobacco usage continues to be a rampant problem among the American population regardless of age, gender, or ethnicity. Interpersonal relationships have been associated with statistical frequency in the patterns of tobacco usage. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between cigarette usage and interpersonal relationships that have motivated an individual to quit smoking. Participants were (N = 23,204) adolescents and early adulthood participants (Mean age = 15.83, SD = 4.53), with 41.8% of the sample reporting they currently use cigarettes and another 36.0% of the sample reporting no current cigarette usage (measured using the Audio Computer-Assisted Self-Interviews (ACASI). From the current study, 45.0% of participants reported their close friends and family did not disapprove of their cigarette smoking, 19.0% reported their close friends and family only somewhat disapproved, and 12.8.% reported their close friends and family very much disapproved of their cigarette smoking. Interpersonal influence that motivated an individual to quit smoking and cigarette usage was measured using a secondary data analysis from the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study. It was hypothesized that there is a statistically significant relationship between cigarette usage and interpersonal relationships having motivated an individual to quit smoking. Frequency data revealed that of the 42% of participants who were currently smoking cigarettes, approximately 32% reported having close friends and family who somewhat or very much disapproved of their smoking and motivated them to quit. Consistent with the hypothesis, current cigarette usage was statistically significantly related to interpersonal influence on individuals quitting smoking with a r = -.150 (p < .01) at the 0.01 level (2-tailed). A simple correlation was conducted using secondary data where both X and Y are random variables beyond the experimenter’s control. The findings yield a weak, positive correlation between current cigarette usage and interpersonal influence on individuals quitting smoking. The R2 and adjusted R2 = .022, and the ANOVA table revealed there is a statistically significant linear relationship between cigarette usage and interpersonal influence on motivating individuals to quit smoking. These results support the rejection of the null hypothesis in which there is no statistically significant relationship between the two variables. Findings of a positive weak correlation suggests other variables are contributing to reported frequency data pertaining to interpersonal influence on cigarette usage. In conclusion, future research studies should investigate other variables such as environmental factors or cultural influences.

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Author Biographies

Deidre Thompson, Prince George's Community College

Department of Social Sciences

Sonial Bell, Prince George's Community College

Department of Sociology 

Published

2020-05-08

How to Cite

McCoy, D., Gill, N., Taylor, V. C. ., Thompson, D., & Bell, S. . (2020). Examining The Relationship Between Cigarette Usage and the Influence of Interpersonal Relationships. Journal of Student Research. https://doi.org/10.47611/jsr.vi.825