The Science of History: Why the Egyptians Never Smiled for Pictures [NYU School of Medicine, New York Institute of Technology, Stony Brook School of Medicine]

Authors

  • Jasmine J. Kannikal New York Institute of Technology, New York University School of Medicine
  • Kunal Oak, D.O. New York University School of Medicine
  • Mohammad Zaidi, D.O. Stony Brook School of Medicine

Keywords:

Paleontology, Tetracycline, Oral Health, Nubian

Abstract

The Ancient Nubians have historically been renowned for their significant contributions to medicine. In spite of this, extremely poor oral health plagued this population. Paleopathological studies depict pronounced dental deterioration patterns far exceeding normal physiological progression. The advanced wear is popularly attributed to sand particle contamination of their daily diets. However, considering that individual wear mechanisms rarely act in isolation, we propose that adverse biochemical factors arising from regular consumption of tetracycline- fortified beer induced calcium malabsorption, and thus provided a synergistic diathesis in potentiating these effects.

We examine these implications within the context of prevalent therapeutic remedies, bone fluorescence labeling data, and sociocultural attitudes when making the link between tetracycline and the compromised integrity of teeth, while citing the emergence of antibiotics actually predating formally-accepted convention.


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Author Biography

Jasmine J. Kannikal, New York Institute of Technology, New York University School of Medicine

Jasmine Kannikal, M.I.B. is a medical school candidate with an international business background and extensive clinical practicum that translates into a healthcare fluency adapted to a 21st century perspective. A Magna Cum Laude graduate, McGowan scholar, Harvard research trainee, and published author, her breadth of experience spans academia, applied science, research, and population health. Guided by her affinity for public policy and healthcare disparities amongst the underserved, her professional endeavors continue to thrive at the intersection of medicine and advocacy within the community.

Published

2019-04-24

How to Cite

Kannikal, J. J., Oak, D.O., K., & Zaidi, D.O., M. (2019). The Science of History: Why the Egyptians Never Smiled for Pictures [NYU School of Medicine, New York Institute of Technology, Stony Brook School of Medicine]. Journal of Student Research. Retrieved from https://jofsr.org/index.php/path/article/view/704